Wing Print recycled glass bowl

Recycled window glass bowl

Recycled window glass printed with an original pattern, fused and slumped into a bowl.

1 comments
Cinahon
Cinahon

Hi Jodi Thanks for all your wonderful information! I too live in Australia and it is SO hard to get things here. Anyway, I am trying to use more float glass (as the Bullseye and Spectrum are limited and expensive) and wondered if you ever did a tutorial on this. I am just not getting into high fire enamels and I'm trying to figure out ways to print things onto the float! Thanks Jodi!

JeffP
JeffP

Hi Jody

I assume the ink burns off and leaves the frit fused in. Don't think I can get the Armstrong frit here in Australia. All my searching has resulted in nil. Do you think it is possible to finely grind other coloured glass and use that?

 

JeffP
JeffP

May I ask what process you use to print on the glass and is it prior to firing or after?

GlassWithaPast
GlassWithaPast moderator

 @JeffP In theory, it would be possible.  I have had very sporadic results with using ground bottle glass with sheets of window glass and then got busy and abandoned the process.

 

With testing it should be possible to pin something down.  The other possibility is to look into things like enamels or minerals.  Thompson Enamels makes a line for float glass.  I've also been working with Mica Luster's recently with very good results.  You could try encasing ground aluminum, copper or brass shavings between layers of glass using the same stamping technique.  Also, look for porcelain lusters at the ceramic supply shops.  I haven't tried printing with it, but it paints on very nicely and looks great.

 

And yes, the ink burns off.  It's primary job is to hang onto the powdered glass until you can get the piece in the kiln.

GlassWithaPast
GlassWithaPast moderator

 @JeffP Hi Jeff;  The process is similar to block printing.  I carve a custom stamp using rubber sheet, then load up the carving (similar to a stamp) with a sticky ink (embossing ink, it's a scrapbooking product) and then sprinkle Armstrong's Float Fire frit over the printing and dump off the extra frit.  This all happens when the float glass is flat and unfired.  Then I do a full fuse firing, followed by a slump firing to shape.

 

You could do the same thing with commercially available stamps, but I prefer to make my own for copyright reasons.  Let me know if that answers your question, if not, I can work up a photo tutorial in the next few weeks that shows all the steps and the products.

 

Jodi