Tag Archive for fused glass art

Q & A Monday – July 8, 2013

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Jodi McRaney RushoHere we are again with Q & A Monday!  These are all reader questions submitted via e-mail.  Personal details have been omitted for privacy.  If one of these questions is your and you’d like attribution and a back link, let me know.  If you have a question of your own, send it on over via the contact form.

  • Q:  I would like to make dinner plates and salad bowl out of green wine bottles. Most of the projects I see on your blog are only using one bottle in them. Can I use multiple bottles to make a bigger plate 10″-13″? Read more
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Plaster Elements in Fused Glass

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Sea Turtle Tray with plaster elementsUsing plaster elements in fused glass is an easy way to add variety to your basic stock of molds and shapes.  The little plaster elements are made using a mold, and a mixture of pottery plaster and silica flour in a 1:1 ratio.  However, you can also achieve excellent results with basic plaster of paris. Read more

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Engraving on Recycled Glass

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Sometimes it is fun to just gear up and doodle on glass with an engraving tool.  Typically, the engraving happens after the artwork is complete, so the lines are much more opaque and free form than the lines in the carved work featured here.   I like to use my flex-shaft with a tiny diamond ball tip, and the same water set up as the glass carving.

Engraving can be a little tricky, since it is free hand, and the artwork isn’t usually flat.  However, with a bit of practice, it is a nice way to expand your options.

'Woven' - Engraved Recycled Glass Vessel

'Woven' - Engraved Recycled Glass Vessel

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North Rose Wolcott High School, Student Work

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Last January I had the pleasure of talking with Howard Skinner, the art teacher at North Rose Wolcott High School about the possibility of his students working with recycled glass. What a fabulous surprise to get photo’s of the projects. These students are doing some seriously cool glasswork.

From an artist’s point of view, this is really about the best thing that can happen. If my work and knowledge can inspire kids to branch out and explore, then I’m doing my job right! (of course, having an expert like Howard as your teacher helps too…)

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Windbreak and Best Actress award(s)

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Windbreak

Windbreak

Windbreak

Windbreak started coming to Farmer’s Market with me during the summer of 2007. One of my favorite people (we’ll call him Don) came to visit it every week for quite a few weeks straight.

Towards the middle of the summer, Don’s wife (let’s call her Annette)decided to give Windbreak to Don for Christmas. At that point Windbreak didn’t have a base, so casually, during one of the weekly visits, I asked Don for advice on building the perfect base.

Turns out Don had definite opinions about that. Which I followed.

Well, this went on for the rest of the summer. Annette and I managed to keep a straight face until the very end.

The best/worst part was having to tell Don that Windbreak had been sold. Ouch!

Needless to say, Don was surprised on Christmas, and Annette and I should have gotten some kind of award for acting!

Windbreak measures 15″ wide and approximately 10″ tall. Hand-carved and slumped recycled glass 3/8″ thick. Mounted in a solid walnut base with LED lights.

 






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