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Q & A Monday – July 8, 2013

Jodi McRaney RushoHere we are again with Q & A Monday!  These are all reader questions submitted via e-mail.  Personal details have been omitted for privacy.  If one of these questions is your and you’d like attribution and a back link, let me know.  If you have a question of your own, send it on over via the contact form.

  • Q:  I would like to make dinner plates and salad bowl out of green wine bottles. Most of the projects I see on your blog are only using one bottle in them. Can I use multiple bottles to make a bigger plate 10″-13″? Continue reading Q & A Monday – July 8, 2013
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Q & A Monday – 4/22/2013

Jodi McRaney Rusho  Welcome to Q & A Monday!  Where we answer reader questions about all things recycled glass.  I’ve removed personal details for privacy reasons, if one of these questions was yours and you’d like attribution, let me know.  If you have a question, send it over! Continue reading Q & A Monday – 4/22/2013

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Q & A Monday, 4/15/13

Jodi McRaney RushoHere we are again at another Q & A Monday.  Today is all about questions from facebook fans.  If you haven’t liked the Glass With a Past page on facebook, you may want to.  The updates are shorter and more frequent, and there are often comments from other glass-o-philes with valuable information.  Once again, I have omitted personal details for privacy, if one of these questions is yours and you would like attribution and a track back, let me know!

  • Q: A very good friend sent me several bottles from the naval academy where our husbands went to school prior to flight training. The bottles all have enamel on them and she has asked me to make a couple bowls out of them. I have cut the bottles into rings and would like to know if you might know a temperature they could share that would fuse the rings to stick together and not burn off the enamel. If you dont know, how about a starting point to test the glass ? What schedule do you use when you have enamel on glass you want to slump? TY~~ Continue reading Q & A Monday, 4/15/13
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Q & A Monday – March 18, 2013

Jodi McRaney RushoHere we are at another Question and Answer Monday.  These are reader questions, which I thought may also be useful for everyone.  If you have a question, send it over.  (I’ve removed personal details for privacy reasons, if you submitted a question and would like attribution and a back link, let me know!)

Wow!  Last week’s Tech Tip was extremely popular, the number one question last week was:

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Q & A Monday – March 11, 2013

Jodi McRaney RushoWelcome to Q & A Monday, which is all about answering reader questions.  I’m presenting a demonstration about making your own texture tiles this coming weekend for the Glass Art Guild of Utah, so all our questions today are about molds.  If you have a question, send it on over, I just may have an answer!  (I’ve removed personal details and names for privacy.  If you asked a question and would like your name listed with a back link, just let me know.)

  • Q:  I am SO glad I found you online and am now a subscriber to your  newsletters, only thing is I’m bummed you are located in Utah! I am in  Oregon and would LOVE to learn how to make my own molds like the ones you show in this link:  http://glasswithapast.com/bottle-glass-and-kiln-carving/ – do you have any kind of online class I could “attend” or something like that? I own a Trio glass kiln, and could probably “rent” some time at my local art college to fire a ceramic mold to bisque level  – My experience is very  limited (no clay work ever), I basically got interested in glass art and bought a Trio (bottle slumping kiln) before I had ever even worked with glass and kind of just figured out a “recipe” how to make wine bottles into serving trays, etc. and now I’m hooked (as I thought I would be!). Any thoughts/advice for building my own (wine bottle slumping) molds/tiles (like the ever so popular “Bon Apetit” mold see below – I own this one and use it and love it but I’d love to make personalized molds with my own artwork) and also tile making molds like you feature on your site? Continue reading Q & A Monday – March 11, 2013
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Q & A Monday – March 4, 2013

Jodi McRaney RushoOne of the really cool parts about this blog is I get asked a lot of really great questions, some of which I even know the answers to. Since the answers may help others as well, I’m posting them here. If you have a question, don’t be shy, send it on over! (I have left off the names of the question senders for privacy. If you sent a question and would like attribution and a back link, let me know!)

  • Q: I am so happy to have found your site and look forward to learning more about & experimenting with recycled glass. I do have a question… Can you mix different colored bottle glass together, like the dark  blue sky vodka and the light blue sapphire gin bottles, in a pot melt? I’m not sure if all bottle glass is the same or if there is a compatibility problem. Continue reading Q & A Monday – March 4, 2013
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Q and A Monday – 2/25/13

Jodi McRaney RushoOne of the really cool parts about this blog is I get asked a lot of really great questions, some of which I even know the answers to.  Since the answers may help others as well, I’m posting them here. If you have a question, don’t be shy, send it on over! (I have left off the names of the question senders for privacy. If you sent a question and would like attribution and a back link, let me know!)

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Glass Reference Books

I recently began working on a project requiring reference books (it’s a secret), and I was pleasantly surprised by how many glass books I own. Just for interests sake, I thought I’d give you a rundown of all of them and which ones are my favorites:

Dr. Fay V. Tooley (Ed). Handbook of Glass Manufacture, Volumes I (1961) and II (1974). Books for Industry, Inc. and Glss Industry Magazine.  New York, NY.

This is a set of college textbooks and whitepapers about glass manufacturing both historically and in current factories.  If you can, get the revised versions that were updated after Float glass became industry standard.  Not light reading, but solid science that you can use.  There are only very brief mentions of art glass.

Samuel R. Scholes and Charles H. Green. Modern Glass Practice (1975).  Cahner Publishers

Also a college textbook.  If you can, get the revised edition from the 1970’s.  So much amazing information about color mixing and oxides, as well as annealing and manufacturing.  This was recommended to me by a lampworker who calls it her “glass color bible”.

Stone, Graham. Firing Schedules for Glass (2000). Self Published, Melborne, AUS

This is a comb bound book with firing schedules for every possible thickness of glass you can imagine.  Graham has a dry wit that makes the book fun too.

Eberle, Bettina. Creative Glass Techniques (1997). Lark Books, Asheville NC

This was my first glass book, lots of pretty pictures.

Lundstrom, Boyce. Kiln Firing Glass (1983), Advanced Fusing Techniques (1989) and Glass Casting and Mold Making (1989), Vitreous Publications

Boyce’s 3 volume set of Glass Fusing Books were what got me started.  The books are geared toward art glass, but cover enough glass theory (which applies to all kinds of glass) that they are very useful indeed!

Reynolds, Gil. The Fused Glass Handbook (1990).  Hidden Valley Books, Scottsdale AZ.

Geared toward Art Glass users.

Please let me know in the comments of any other glass reference books that you’ve found useful, particularly in regards to using recycled glass.






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