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  1. [...] Tale of Ten Tiles – In which I make fabulous glass tiles. [...]

  2. [...] With A Past Just another WordPress site HomeAboutWholesale ← Recycling recycled artwork is so meta. Flxible → [...]

  3. [...] Red Butte Garden Glass Donation – in which you get a glimpse of what life as a recycled glass artist looks like. [...]

  4. [...] With A Past Just another WordPress site HomeAboutWholesale ← Bubbles, tiny bubbles. (Laurence would be proud.) Recycling recycled artwork is so meta. → [...]

  5. [...] Prolific Paperweights – warning to the wise…don’t store paperweights in the dark, things happen… Tags: corporate gifts, glass awards, Recycled glass, trophies [...]

  6. [...] Crucible Casting – Take 2 – In which pot melting goes big or goes home. [...]

  7. [...] Tree Window Oh look, more Recycled Glass Art that can be permanently installed in your home: Tale of Ten Tiles – Handmade recycled glass tiles make you more interesting.  Fact. Tiles – Slicks [...]

  8. [...] of firings are in order, perhaps with different colors. Take 2?  Wait, what happened to Take 1? Recycled Glass Pot Melt Tests – Oh, here it is. Recycled Glass Wave – More casting [...]

  9. [...] refinement based on increased quantity of glass. More glass mixing!  More technical stuff! Recycled Glass Bottle Compatibility – Yes Virginia, you can mix recycled glass types [...]

  10. [...] Windbreak and the Best Actress Award – Not quite the red carpet, but it works for me! [...]

  11. [...] Recycled Glass Pot Melt Tests   Where I show how to void the warranty on tempered glass with astounding results! [...]

  12. [...] Compatibility questions.  More complicated than the office Christmas Party! [...]

  13. [...] Recycled Architectural Glass.  Architectural glass made with recycled architectural glass.  Groovy! [...]

  14. [...] With A Past Just another WordPress site HomeAboutWholesale ← Varieties of Window Glass [...]

  15. [...] Bubbles, Tiny Bubbles – What you can do with those hard water deposits. [...]

  16. [...] year I was gifted with a big glass donation from Red Butte Garden.  As I was unloading all of the glass, one of the pieces cracked.  That may sound like bad news, [...]

  17. [...] Varieties of Window Glass – Turns out all transparent substances aren’t the same. [...]

  18. [...] an earlier post we talked about using recycled textured glass in artwork.  There is also other ways to get a texture in your artwork.  Carving the raw glass with a [...]

  19. [...] Here’s the dirt – Using DIRT in your designs, you dirty thing you. [...]

  20. [...] Not sure what to fire first?  Try some factory textured glass. [...]

  21. [...] With A Past Just another WordPress site HomeAboutWholesale ← Recycled Glass Firing Schedules [...]

  22. [...] so the lines are much more opaque and free form than the lines in the carved work featured here.   I like to use my flex-shaft with a tiny diamond ball tip, and the same water set up as the [...]

  23. [...] under the glass and fused.  I like to put the fiber paper in the mold, fire the glass using a full fuse temperature, but with a top temperature of 1485 (top fire) or 1500 (side fire).  This gives you [...]

  24. [...] With A Past Just another WordPress site HomeAboutWholesale ← Engraving on Recycled Glass [...]

  25. [...] Here’s the Dirt – Inclusion of Dirt in recycled glass artwork. [...]

  26. [...] 5:  Fire!  I do have some suggested firing schedules if you aren’t sure where to start. Fired Glass over Fiber [...]

  27. [...] why my star is all yellow and funky?  I used low-E glass for this [...]

  28. [...] Pot Melt Tests – Here’s a little intro to what you can use all that tempered glass for. [...]

  29. [...] Now, wasn’t that nice?  Shall we read some more about kiln carving? [...]

  30. [...] pieces of Low E were fired at a full fuse in a side fire kiln.  I also included our friend Plain Glass for contrast.  These pieces were fired one with the film [...]

  31. [...] Making art from Recycled Textured Glass – in which we see all the cool stuff you can do with that ugly glass from Grandma’s house. [...]

  32. [...] Not sure what to fire first?  Try some factory textured glass. [...]

  33. [...] Now, wasn’t that nice?  Shall we read some more about kiln carving? [...]

  34. [...] Recycled GlassRecycled Glass JewelryRecycled Glass SculptureWholesale ← Kiln Carving Recycled Glass with Fiber Paper Epic Kiln Carving → [...]

  35. [...] so the lines are much more opaque and free form than the lines in the carved work featured here.   I like to use my flex-shaft with a tiny diamond ball tip, and the same water set up as the [...]

  36. [...] Love the glass trees?  Here’s another super cool tree project! [...]

  37. [...] Windbreak and the Best Actress Award – Not quite the red carpet, but it works for me! [...]

  38. [...] fascinated?  Here’s more trivia about window glass than you ever thought [...]

  39. [...] fancy recycled glass tile…. Tags: green living, recycled glass tile, sustainable [...]

  40. [...] paper not your thing?  Maybe some hand carving? Tags: fiber paper, fusing recycled glass, fusing schedule, fusing window glass, glass texture, [...]

  41. [...] Here’s the Dirt – Inclusion of Dirt in recycled glass artwork. [...]

  42. [...] prepared to test!  Use a full fuse firing schedule first and see how much detail your tile picks up.  If you have deeply carved texture, you may need [...]

  43. [...] a tack fuse schedule (full fuse firing schedule, minus about 125 degrees from the top [...]

  44. [...] are some firing schedules for recycled glass if you aren’t sure where to start.  I use a full fuse for this [...]

  45. [...] wait!  Do you have the December Kiln Carving pattern [...]

  46. [...] Recycled GlassRecycled Glass JewelryRecycled Glass SculpturePressWholesale ← Kiln carving Pattern for December Epic Kiln Carving → [...]

  47. [...] Ack!  I need a firing schedule, but not this one!  Where are the basic firing and slumping schedules? [...]

  48. [...] This is super cool, what else can I melt window glass into? [...]

  49. [...] Interested in more information about texture tiles? [...]

  50. [...] in including organic materials in your glass [...]

  51. [...] More information about things to do with bottles! [...]

  52. [...] want my bottle glass all hot and melty! Tags: cutting bottles, fusing bottles, glass projects, Recycled bottle glass, recycled glass art, [...]

  53. [...] with a regular firing schedule, and guess what you get? Martini Glasses post [...]

  54. [...] Want to try another experiment? Try this one! [...]

  55. [...] But how much bottle glass do I have?  Glad you [...]

  56. [...] my standard recycled glass fusing schedule, I flattened six different [...]

  57. [...] enough; we were trying to figure out a way to modify the Self Portrait Paperweight project for the Hawthorne ELP Artist Residency.  Originally I had planned to have the kids make a clay positive face, then pour a plaster/silica [...]

  58. [...] to prep and load.  I finished loading at 4:30 Tuesday afternoon and set the firing schedule for a full fuse with a 20 minute soak at the high temperature.  At 5 a.m. Wednesday morning, I have [...]

  59. [...] 4.  Cut a regular 750 mL bottle the same height as the cut fiber paper pattern.  (this may be a unique to you size depending on what percentage you print the pattern at).  Clean the cut bottle and place the cylinder centered on the fiber pattern. [...]

  60. [...] 4.  Cut a piece of glass large enough to cover the entire cut pattern.  I’m using float glass for this project.  Fire to a full fuse. [...]

  61. [...] Recycled GlassRecycled Glass JewelryRecycled Glass SculpturePressShopWholesale ← April Kiln Carving Pattern [...]

  62. [...] 4.  Cut a piece of glass in the desired size and shape.  Fire to full fuse: [...]

  63. [...] was super fun, let’s do another one! That was fun, but now I want some pretty tack fusing pictures….can you do [...]

  64. [...] use with recycled bottle glass and will fit a regular 750 mL bottle if printed at 100%.  Here is a tutorial about how to cut and calculate bottle glass for fusing if you need [...]

  65. [...] carving can be used on an epic scale, go [...]

  66. [...] to fuse, but don’t know how much bottle glass you [...]

  67. [...] within 4.5″ (11.4 cm) wide because that’s how wide a regular wine bottle is when you melt it flat.  The patterns can be printed at different % for larger or smaller [...]

  68. [...] HomeAboutPortfolioFunctional Recycled Glass ArtRecycled Glass JewelryRecycled Glass SculpturePressShopWholesale ← Fusing Large and Small Bottles [...]

  69. [...] Guess what else you can include in glass?  Dirt!  and sand! [...]

  70. [...] Want another handy step by step?  How about How to make a kiln carving pattern? [...]

  71. [...] Recycled Glass ArtRecycled Glass JewelryRecycled Glass SculpturePressShopWholesale ← Making a Triangle Glass Bead Mold [...]

  72. [...] used a standard fusing schedule to make my beads.  In fact, it’s nice to be able to just tuck these little molds in around [...]

  73. [...] Beads are nice, but how do I get the bottle into pieces? [...]

  74. [...] Fusing glass bottles has never been easier!  It’s never been harder either, but don’t let that stop you! [...]

  75. [...] Bubbles, tiny Bubbles – Now with even less champagne!  But more bubbles! [...]

  76. [...] best results, use smoothly sawn donuts that measure between 3/8″ and 3/4″ [...]

  77. [...] 5.  Cut glass to fit and fire with a full fuse schedule. [...]

  78. [...] This pattern is specifically designed for a 1.5L bottle.  Cut the bottle cylinder 6.25-6.5″ tall.  This size should give you a nearly perfect square piece of glass. [...]

  79. [...] firing schedule I used is the standard fusing schedule, but I extended the top hold to 30 minutes and adjusted the cool down to accommodate the thicker [...]

  80. [...] tile what do you do with it? There is a detailed blog post here if you want to create your own: Texture Tile Molds for Fused Glass Thanks Jodi McRaney Rusho and Glass With a Past! Since I already had some autumn leaf colored [...]

  81. [...] measure up 2” and mark the bottle all the way around. Carefully cut on this line using the bottle cutting method of your choice.  (I prefer a tile [...]

  82. [...] the bottle bottom with the outside of the base up and fuse over the fiber [...]

  83. [...] a fancy lid, place a plaster element between the bottle bottom and the fiber paper before fusing. This works best if the plaster element [...]

  84. [...] your favorite epoxy, glue on the pin back. A variation of this is to add nichrome or brass loops before fusing and make a pendant style [...]

  85. [...] glass to fit the kiln carving pattern and fuse.  I’m using the bottom of an empty pickle bottle for this [...]

  86. [...] Cut a piece of glass to fit the pattern.  This pattern will work with a large bottle cylinder, as well as with recycled window glass, then full fuse. [...]

  87. [...] This pattern is specifically designed to work with the body cylinder of a standard size wine or spirits bottle.  You can, of course, use any other glass that strikes your fancy instead.  After you have placed the pattern and the glass on a prepared kiln shelf, full fuse. [...]

  88. [...] to a full fuse. The raised corner pieces will fuse fully to the base, but won’t completely flatten [...]

  89. [...] You can see some of my copper inclusions have shifted slightly.  I’m okay with that, but if that type of thing makes you nuts, glue down each copper piece with a tiny spot of white glue to keep it in place until it’s fused.  When you are ready to go, place the entire project on a prepared kiln shelf prior to full fusing. [...]

  90. [...] fiber form we just made, and one on a traditional floral form that has been kilnwashed.  Using a slump firing schedule, I can slump both pieces of glass at [...]

  91. [...] glass to fit over the pattern, or, prepare a bottle that will cover the kiln carving pattern (a magnum wine bottle would do).  Fire to a full [...]

  92. [...] how you get your lines so straight in the you glass etching pieces as shown on your “Creating Texture – Carving” page. I am just getting into etching and can’t images lines that [...]

  93. [...] I saw your post on epic kiln carving and I have a question. I have wanted to try something like this for a while, but have been freaked [...]

  94. [...] more than ceramic as it cools, it’s best to cover pots with fiber paper before using them as floral formers, the fiber paper gives a bit of squeeze room to the glass so it doesn’t break as it [...]

  95. [...] Recycled Glass Firing Schedules [...]

  96. [...] Step 5.  Fuse using a full fuse schedule. [...]

  97. [...] of a regular sized wine bottle.  If you are unsure of how large your glass needs to be, do a quick measurement.  Fire to a full [...]

  98. [...] After removing all of the gray areas, discard the paper pattern.  Carefully put the cut fiber paper into your kiln on a prepared shelf and cover with glass.  This pattern is sized for the body cylinder of a regular sized wine bottle.  If you are unsure of how large your glass needs to be, do a quick measurement.  Fire to a full fuse. [...]

  99. [...] up with a really great solution.  I had a bunch of left over prepared art glass supplies from the Glass Mosaic project earlier in the [...]

  100. [...] would be a great pattern to include in a wall vase or a soap [...]

  101. [...] 3.  Once all of the gray areas are removed, remove the paper pattern and place the fiber paper on a prepared kiln shelf.  Fire to a full fuse. [...]

  102. […] 9.  Now, get that thing into the kiln under a nice piece of glass (1/4″ float in my case), and fire it to a full fuse. […]

  103. […] Bottle on the mold, fired with a slump firing schedule. […]

  104. […] bottle neck flattens, the fiber paper will create a vase space inside the bottle neck.  Fire at a full fuse.  If you get excessive needling on the cut edge of the vase, lower your top temperature by 20-25 […]

  105. […] be using for projects with the very little kids (5 yr olds). Here’s a post detailing how: http://glasswithapast.com/cold-working-with-a-rock-polisher/ For your application, I would run the chunks dry and only for a few minutes, that will keep the […]

  106. […] leave enough room for the bottle to flatten, here’s a quick way to tell how big the bottle will be when fused flat.  Kiln wash should be 3-5 coats thick, based on manufacturers recommendations.  Typically the […]

  107. […] It’s amazing how many times this one comes up in searches.  I have a couple of videos about cutting bottles with a tile saw, but I think people need to see it a bunch of times before they feel comfortable giving it a go.  […]

  108. […] Another frequent question.  Making glass donuts is fairly easy, hack off the neck of the bottle and fuse it flat.  The real trick is how to make […]

  109. […] retrospect, I should have measured my glass better so it covered more of my pattern.  Turns out, even the experts can do it better sometimes!  […]

  110. […] it looks like the bottle is solid blue glass, you can use my standard firing schedule for a full fuse (not a […]

  111. […] on top of the fiber paper inside the vase (similar to the plaster embellishment on the lid of the trinket boxes). Remember that this element will have to be broken down to be removed, so try to use a relatively […]

  112. […] Stack your two pieces of glass carefully, with the name on top in the kiln and full fuse. […]

  113. […] There are a lot of factors that go into making perfect donuts, I cover some of them in a post about Glass Donuts and Rings.  There is an additional factor though, that was covered in a newsletter.  A really good diamond […]

  114. […] Hawthorne Artist Residency  […]

  115. […] Mosaic Fused Art Glass Paintings […]

  116. […] Texture Tiles and Fused Glass […]

  117. […] here they are after a standard full fuse firing.  Notice how much smaller the leaves […]

  118. […] After removing all the gray areas and underlying fiber paper, discard the paper pattern (or use it as a template for a different project).  Place the fiber pattern under a clean large bottle bottom and fire to a full fuse. […]

  119. […] to a slump temperature using the standard slump firing schedule, or whichever one works best for […]

  120. […] to a slump firing using the standard slump schedule, or whatever firing schedule works best for […]

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